Social justice is based on the concepts of human rights and equality, and can be defined as "the way in which human rights are manifested in the everyday lives of people at every level of society".  Social equity implies fair access to livelihood, education, and resources; full participation in the political and cultural life of the community; and self-determination in meeting fundamental needs. 

Topic Colleagues

The Pando Team's pictureThe Pando Team
Takayoshi Kusago's pictureTakayoshi Kusago
Audrey Henderson's pictureAudrey Henderson
Kim Yip's pictureKim Yip
Jorge Gomez's pictureJorge Gomez
Mohamed Diouri's pictureMohamed Diouri
Giles Thomson's pictureGiles Thomson
Mahesh Jayaraman's pictureMahesh Jayaraman
Riobart (Rob) Breen's pictureRiobart (Rob)...
Michelle Lewis's pictureMichelle Lewis
Brennan Lowery's pictureBrennan Lowery
Suzette Jackson's pictureSuzette Jackson
Michael Woodbridge's pictureMichael Woodbridge
Garam LEE's pictureGaram LEE
Wouter de Zeeuw's pictureWouter de Zeeuw
George Poulakidas's pictureGeorge Poulakidas
Jeb Brugmann's pictureJeb Brugmann
Helen Pineo's pictureHelen Pineo
Ben Clark's pictureBen Clark
Samara Sonmor's pictureSamara Sonmor
Lisa Stiebel's pictureLisa Stiebel
Gregg Coppen's pictureGregg Coppen
Marli Bodhi's pictureMarli Bodhi
Patricia Ballamingie's picturePatricia...

Topic Events

Energy Democracy

Energy Democracy Join SSF and Island Press in a 90-minute webinar about the emerging field of energy democracy, a movement that frames the struggle of working people, low income communities, and communities of color to take control of energy resources and use those resources to empower their communities. Energy poverty is a shocking political reality in the United States and is more important than ever to combat as we face the impacts of climate change.
May 04 2018, 10:15am - 11:45am PDT
PDT

Montreal & ICLEI Circular Economy Challenge Contest

The Ville de Montréal and ICLEI are seeking solutions!

The Ville de Montréal, in collaboration with ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Climate CoLab, just launched an international contest on circular economy!

The Challenge

Jan 12 to Apr 01 2018, 9:00am - 12:00am
ON, Toronto, m5v3a8, 401 Richmond St. West

UN Summer Academy 2017: Localizing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

The UNSSC Knowledge Centre for Sustainable Development is pleased to invite you to the UN Summer Academy 2017 titled Localizing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development happening from 21 to 25 August 2017 in Bonn, Germany. This 5-day engaging programme fosters rich interaction on issues relevant to the work of the UN and its partners in the context off the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement through panel discussions, workshops, excursions and practical clinics such as Share Fair and Application Labs (App Labs).

Aug 21 to 25 2017, 9:00am - 6:00pm
CET

Topic Resources

Tracking the SDGs in Canadian Cities: SDG 1

"In 2011, 81 per cent of Canadians lived in urban centres (Statistics Canada, 2011). Cities are the epicentres of arts and culture as well as hubs for business and economic growth, and as such they are important stakeholders in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. To ensure that cities are on track to contribute to these goals, assessments of indicators aligned with the SDG framework are necessary to identify what is working and where more attention should be devoted. IISD’s SGD Indicator Portal tracks SDG progress in 13 cities across Canada.

WHO AND WHAT GETS LEFT BEHIND? ASSESSING CANADA’S DOMESTIC STATUS ON THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS

"This [Brookings Institution Working Paper 108, October 2017] paper presents a framework for assessing Canada’s status on the SDGs. It aims to adhere as much as practical to the formal U.N. targets, indicators, and database, while also drawing extensively from other sources, especially for sub-national assessments.

Equity in neighbourhood walkability? A comparative analysis of three large U.S. cities

This study examines the spatial and statistical relationships between social vulnerability (SV) and neighbourhood walkability across three large U.S. cities with different urban typologies and development patterns: Charlotte, NC (a low-density, fast-growing “Sunbelt” city); Pittsburgh, PA (a moderate density, shrinking “Rust Belt” city); and Portland, OR (a progressive West Coast city known for its sprawl-containment policies). Binary logistic regression, independent-samples t-tests, and mapping techniques are employed to determine whether neighbourhoods with high SV (i.e.